todaysdocument:

Take your Child to Work Day

One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She was 51 inches high. Has been in the mill one year. Sometimes works at night. Runs 4 sides - 48 [cents] a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, “I don’t remember,” then confidentially, “I’m not old enough to work, but do just the same.” Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C., 12/22/1908

Taken by investigative photographer Lewis Hine, this photograph is one of a series of black-and-white prints given to the Children’s Bureau by the National Child Labor Committee. The almost five hundred photographs represent a fraction of the approximately 5,000 photographs Hine took for the committee to document working and living conditions for children.
(A sobering reminder that bringing children to work was not always a purely educational experience or a special occasion.)  
We’ll be observing Take Your Child to Work Day at the National Archives on the week of May 5, to coincide with Public Service Recognition Week. Stay tuned!



When you are child labor, every day is bring your child to work day.
::cue debbie downer music::

todaysdocument:

Take your Child to Work Day

One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She was 51 inches high. Has been in the mill one year. Sometimes works at night. Runs 4 sides - 48 [cents] a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, “I don’t remember,” then confidentially, “I’m not old enough to work, but do just the same.” Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C., 12/22/1908

Taken by investigative photographer Lewis Hine, this photograph is one of a series of black-and-white prints given to the Children’s Bureau by the National Child Labor Committee. The almost five hundred photographs represent a fraction of the approximately 5,000 photographs Hine took for the committee to document working and living conditions for children.

(A sobering reminder that bringing children to work was not always a purely educational experience or a special occasion.)  

We’ll be observing Take Your Child to Work Day at the National Archives on the week of May 5, to coincide with Public Service Recognition Week. Stay tuned!

When you are child labor, every day is bring your child to work day. ::cue debbie downer music::

Pumping the Brakes

Should I be worried that my husband spent all afternoon building me a bike with no brakes?

Sometimes you need to look at happy pictures when you are feeling anything but.  Count your blessings, people. On Easter and every day.

Sometimes you need to look at happy pictures when you are feeling anything but. Count your blessings, people. On Easter and every day.

socialrugrats:

A dog eating popcorn has never been so funny…or at least to this little girl!

I wish my dogs ate popcorn!

http://umcanyounot.tumblr.com/post/82894081712/only-a-phase-my-mother-died-from-cancer-three

only-a-phase:

My mother died from cancer three months after I turned 11. It was the summer after I’d finished the fifth grade. Everything she ever told me in my life, she told me before I was twelve.

One of the things I remember her telling me was that I should not to take a shower if I…

One of my all-time favorite photos!

socialrugrats:

I myself love a good gut-wrenching laugh! Laughter is good for you. : ) 

Did you know a child laughs on average 300 times a day while an adult laughs on average five times a day? Surely we can do better than that!

image

ilovecharts:

Middle East Relationships: It’s Complicated
via proteanarts

24 People Interviewed for an Impossible Job Paying Nothing: Then They Found Out Who Does It Everyday

You don’t have to be a mom to feel this in the feels.

But I think our childhood is more decisive than people generally are willing to admit. And what happens to us later can either cast a shadow or shine a light on what’s already been created — or ruined — within us.

Ingmar Bergman, from an interview (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via umcanyounot)

(Source: kittyit, via robdelaney)